Still Only A Pawn In Their Game.

oday’s headlines have many recalling the “March On Washington” in 1963. A 22-year-old Bob Dylan saw 34-year-old Martin Luther King Jr. give his “I Have A Dream” speech in person, – and performed at the very same podium, singing his (at the time) controversial song about the assassination of Medgar Evers.

A youthful Bob Dylan performs at the 1963 “March On Washington”

Only a Pawn In Their Game – Bob Dylan

A bullet from the back of a bush
Took Medgar Evers’ blood
A finger fired the trigger to his name
A handle hid out in the dark
A hand set the spark
Two eyes took the aim
Behind a man’s brain
But he can’t be blamed
He’s only a pawn in their game

A South politician preaches to the poor white man
“You got more than the blacks, don’t complain
You’re better than them, you been born with white skin, ” they explain
And the Negro’s name
Is used, it is plain
For the politician’s gain
As he rises to fame
And the poor white remains
On the caboose of the train
But it ain’t him to blame
He’s only a pawn in their game

The deputy sheriffs, the soldiers, the governors get paid
And the marshals and cops get the same
But the poor white man’s used in the hands of them all like a tool
He’s taught in his school
From the start by the rule
That the laws are with him
To protect his white skin
To keep up his hate
So he never thinks straight
‘Bout the shape that he’s in
So it ain’t him to blame
He’s only a pawn in their game

From the poverty shacks, he looks from the cracks to the tracks
And the hoof beats pound in his brain
And he’s taught how to walk in a pack, shoot in the back
With his fist in a clinch
To hang and to lynch
To hide ‘neath a hood
To kill with no pain
Like a dog on a chain
He ain’t got no name
But it ain’t him to blame
He’s only a pawn in their game

Today, Medgar Evers was buried from the bullet that he caught
They lowered him down as a king
But when the shadowy sun sets on the one
That fired the gun
He’ll see by his grave
On the stone that remains
Carved next to his name
His epitaph plain
Only a pawn in their game

Civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his world-famous “I Have A Dream” speech in 1963 at the “March On Washington”, five years before he became the victim of a political assassination conspiracy plot in Memphis, Tennessee at age 39

(Thank you to silesius at YouTube)

Top 2020 Resolution For Poets And Humanity.

New Year’s Resolution for 2020

magine it were possible to carry out a worldwide referendum allowing every human being to weigh in on the question: “Should mankind finally put an end to wars and establish, – starting in 2020, for the 1st time in the history of life on planet Earth – true and long-lasting universal peace?”

Most would likely envision the answer to such a potential voting process to be an overwhelming and unmistakable “Yes!”, with the percentage of world citizens voting in the affirmative approaching 99.99%, excluding the infamous .01% who rely on mass-murderous wars of aggression to maintain their wealth, power and accompanying ultra-privileged lifestyles.

Perhaps the most beneficial #1 New Year’s Resolution for 2020 embraced by humanity relates to manifesting into Earthly reality, for the health, happiness and well-being of this and future generations, that same imaginary referendum-decided goal: Establishing World Peace.

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Men and women poets have expressed such ideal sentiments across time.

“The Persistence of Memory” by Salvador Dali – 1931

“The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of a man into activity, with the subordination of its faculties to each other, according to their relative worth and dignity. He diffuses a tone and spirit of unity, that blends, and (as it were) fuses, each into each, by that synthetic and magical power, to which we have exclusively appropriated the name of imagination.

“This power, first put in action by the will and understanding, and retained under their irremissive, though gentle and unnoticed, control (laxis effertur habenis – Meaning: Carried onward with loose reins; driven with loosened reins) reveals itself in the balance or reconciliation of opposite or discordant qualities; of sameness, with difference; of the general, with the concrete; the idea, with the image; the individual, with the representative; the sense of novelty and freshness, with old and familiar objects; a more than usual state of emotion, with more than usual order; judgment ever awake and steady self-possession, with enthusiasm and feeling profound or vehement; and while it blends and harmonizes the natural and the artificial, still subordinates art to nature; the manner to the matter, and our admiration for the poet to our sympathy with the poetry.”

From: The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798)

He prayeth well, who loveth well

    Both man and bird and beast.

He prayeth best who loveth best

    All things both great and small;

For the dear God who loveth us,

    He made and loveth all.

Quote: “Whenever philosophy has taken into its plan religion, it has ended in skepticism; and whenever religion excludes philosophy, or the spirit or free inquiry, it leads to willful blindness and superstition.”

SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE (1772-1834) British poet, critic, philosopher

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Best wishes for the year 2020 and the new decade of Earth’s history – to man and bird and beast and all things great and small.