MLK, JFK, RFK, 9/11 And More: Dr. William Pepper And Dr. Kevin Barrett.

Attorney Dr. William Pepper talked to radio show host Dr. Kevin Barrett in January 2017 on the murders of Martin Luther King Jr., President John Kennedy and his brother Robert Kennedy, 9/11, Libya, the media … and much, much more.

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Dr Kevin Barrett:  Welcome to Truth Jihad Radio, the radio show that’s actually an all-out struggle for truth.  (Editor’s note: Dr. Kevin Barrett also co-hosts “False Flag Weekly News”NoLiesRadio Channel, on YouTube) I’m Kevin Barrett, bringing on great guests talking about the most important stories that you’re not likely to hear about in the mainstream media.  One of the most important stories in the history of the last century is the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King. And we have one man, more than anyone else, to thank for getting the truth about that incredibly important event out to the world. And that man is my guest William Pepper.  William Pepper has been on this case for decades.  He was a friend of Dr. King. It’s a long story, admirably summarized in his new book The Plot to Kill King, which is an update of his previous two books, Act of State, and…what was the first one?

Dr. William Pepper:  Orders to Kill.

Dr Kevin Barrett:  Orders to Kill.  Yeah, I have a copy.  Milwaukee Public Library, discard copy of that.  Anyway, this new book, The Plot to Kill King, is pretty much a definitive statement. It’s a brilliant piece of work, one of the all-time great historical pieces of detective work.  So it’s an honor to have William Pepper on the show.  Welcome, Bill. How are you?

Dr. William Pepper:  Thank you. Thank you, Kevin.  I’m fine. I’m pleased to be with you.

Dr Kevin Barrett: It’s quite amazing, isn’t it, when we start looking beneath the surface of some of these history-changing events, what we find crawling around underneath.

Dr. William Pepper:  It certainly is.  In fact, this work and the Robert Kennedy one, which I agreed to represent Sirhan on, has made me cognizant of the fact that political assassination has been one of the major change agents throughout all of history—to such an extent that I think I’ll work on an analysis of political assassinations in history.  I’m staggered by the social, economic, and political, changes that have resulted from the removal of leaders and dissidents at various times in human history going back, of course, well before the Crucifixion of Christ.  So it’s worth considering in a broader scope. And of course in our lifetimes we’ve experienced a number of assassinations.  The killing of Martin Luther King was a seminal event in terms of a negative impact of our way of life.

Dr Kevin Barrett:  When I was being attacked by the mainstream media as a 9/11 truth researcher and soon to be ex-professor, I was attacked partly for having mentioned that I thought these political assassinations of the ‘60’s, notably the Kennedys and Dr. King, were obviously not done by lone nuts as we were told.  I responded to their attacks by saying something like:

“Well, call me a ‘conspiracy theorist,’ but I don’t think Julius Caesar was stabbed by a lone nut.”

It’s obvious that there are so many motives for power players to kill people in political assassinations. And yet we have this orthodoxy that it’s always a lone nut.  And even people as smart as Noam Chomsky tell us: “Oh, it doesn’t really matter whether the Kennedys or King or anybody like that lives or dies.  It’s all a big distraction and we should just accept the official story.” And he says similarly idiotic things about 9/11 and other false flags.  How could someone like Chomsky not get it?

Dr. William Pepper:  Well, I think Chomsky gets it.  I think he just refuses to acknowledge it. And whatever his particular reasons are, he just will not deal with the truth when it comes to certain issues.  Political assassination is one.  I’ve had more than one conversation with him and it’s been somewhat embarrassing, because he clearly knows more than he’s willing to admit, for whatever reason.  He and a lot of left thinkers go only so far.  And activists even.  And broadcasters and political figures also go just so far, and they won’t go any further, and that’s a matter of great frustration. Because you then are coming up against (censorship) not only in the mainstream media but also in the progressive media, which itself is serving the cause of injustice.

Dr Kevin Barrett:  Well, and I think there might be a number of reasons for that.  One of them is that people in supposed opposition groups can actually have their career skids greased by cooperating with the authorities and the bad guys.  You have some pretty awful information in your book about heroes of the left like Jesse Jackson and Ralph Abernathy.  These people are seen as dissidents, but they got their public position by cooperating nefariously with the other side. And I imagine that there’s quite a lot of that in the so-called alternative media.

Dr. William Pepper:  Yeah.  I think that’s certainly the case. And the cooperation I think is in many ways worse, and more deceitful, because a lot of these people pretend to be something they’re not. They serve the existing ruling class and the ruling forces in a much more insidious way than the mainstream media does.  So that’s difficult to overcome. And that’s why people like you, Kevin, and the work that you do and the broadcasting that you do, is in many ways a voice in the wilderness—and sometimes in the darkness.  But it’s very important to keep your work going with respect to these events.

Continue reading “MLK, JFK, RFK, 9/11 And More: Dr. William Pepper And Dr. Kevin Barrett.”

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“The US Government Killed MLK Jr.”

As Coretta Scott King remarked, “The jury was clearly convinced by the extensive evidence that was presented during the trial that … the conspiracy of the Mafia, local, state and federal government agencies, were deeply involved in the assassination of my husband.”

MLK’s Nobel Peace Prize Speech: 1964 Wisdom For 2018.

By Jerry Alatalo

“Nothing in the world is more dangerous than a sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.”

  • MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. – Strength and Love (1963)

orn in 1929, Martin Luther King Jr. (MLK) would be 89-years old today – had he lived. One can only imagine what he might have accomplished had he not been shot dead in 1968 at the age of 39, in the decades of his forties, fifties, sixties, seventies, and eighties. People can only imagine what MLK would be saying today, days before the annual celebration of the national holiday Martin Luther King Day – Monday January 15, 2018.

Given certain current American developments and international events making headline news, it is especially fascinating to think about how the 89-year old MLK would react and/or respond. He was only 35-years old when honored with the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, four short years before his murder in Memphis, Tennessee.

In a 1999 civil trial attorney William Pepper, a close friend of Martin Luther King Jr. in the last year of his life, agreed to accept an invitation and represented the King family. American history books have yet to get it right by noting the 1999 Memphis civil trial where a jury concluded that alleged lone assassin James Earl Ray was innocent, and that government, military and law enforcement elements inside the United States were responsible for the political assassination of MLK.

People can get a very good idea what MLK would be saying today given the current state of world affairs by reading his 1964 Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech … delivered more than five decades ago.

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Martin Luther King’s Acceptance Speech, on the occasion of the award of the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, December 10, 1964

Your Majesty, Your Royal Highness, Mr. President, Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen:

I accept the Nobel Prize for Peace at a moment when 22 million Negroes of the United States of America are engaged in a creative battle to end the long night of racial injustice. I accept this award on behalf of a civil rights movement which is moving with determination and a majestic scorn for risk and danger to establish a reign of freedom and a rule of justice. I am mindful that only yesterday in Birmingham, Alabama, our children, crying out for brotherhood, were answered with fire hoses, snarling dogs and even death. I am mindful that only yesterday in Philadelphia, Mississippi, young people seeking to secure the right to vote were brutalized and murdered. And only yesterday more than 40 houses of worship in the State of Mississippi alone were bombed or burned because they offered a sanctuary to those who would not accept segregation. I am mindful that debilitating and grinding poverty afflicts my people and chains them to the lowest rung of the economic ladder.

Therefore, I must ask why this prize is awarded to a movement which is beleaguered and committed to unrelenting struggle; to a movement which has not won the very peace and brotherhood which is the essence of the Nobel Prize.

Sooner or later all the people of the world will have to discover a way to live together in peace …

After contemplation, I conclude that this award which I receive on behalf of that movement is a profound recognition that nonviolence is the answer to the crucial political and moral question of our time – the need for man to overcome oppression and violence without resorting to violence and oppression. Civilization and violence are antithetical concepts. Negroes of the United States, following the people of India, have demonstrated that nonviolence is not sterile passivity, but a powerful moral force which makes for social transformation. Sooner or later all the people of the world will have to discover a way to live together in peace, and thereby transform this pending cosmic elegy into a creative psalm of brotherhood. If this is to be achieved, man must evolve for all human conflict a method which rejects revenge, aggression and retaliation. The foundation of such a method is love.

The tortuous road which has led from Montgomery, Alabama to Oslo bears witness to this truth. This is a road over which millions of Negroes are travelling to find a new sense of dignity. This same road has opened for all Americans a new era of progress and hope. It has led to a new Civil Rights Bill, and it will, I am convinced, be widened and lengthened into a super highway of justice as Negro and white men in increasing numbers create alliances to overcome their common problems.

I accept this award today with an abiding faith in America and an audacious faith in the future of mankind. I refuse to accept despair as the final response to the ambiguities of history. I refuse to accept the idea that the “isness” of man’s present nature makes him morally incapable of reaching up for the eternal “oughtness” that forever confronts him. I refuse to accept the idea that man is mere flotsom and jetsom in the river of life, unable to influence the unfolding events which surround him. I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality.

I refuse to accept the cynical notion that nation after nation must spiral down a militaristic stairway into the hell of thermonuclear destruction. I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word in reality. This is why right temporarily defeated is stronger than evil triumphant. I believe that even amid today’s mortar bursts and whining bullets, there is still hope for a brighter tomorrow. I believe that wounded justice, lying prostrate on the blood-flowing streets of our nations, can be lifted from this dust of shame to reign supreme among the children of men. I have the audacity to believe that peoples everywhere can have three meals a day for their bodies, education and culture for their minds, and dignity, equality and freedom for their spirits. I believe that what self-centered men have torn down men other-centered can build up. I still believe that one day mankind will bow before the altars of God and be crowned triumphant over war and bloodshed, and nonviolent redemptive good will proclaim the rule of the land. “And the lion and the lamb shall lie down together and every man shall sit under his own vine and fig tree and none shall be afraid.” I still believe that We Shall overcome!

This faith can give us courage to face the uncertainties of the future. It will give our tired feet new strength as we continue our forward stride toward the city of freedom. When our days become dreary with low-hovering clouds and our nights become darker than a thousand midnights, we will know that we are living in the creative turmoil of a genuine civilization struggling to be born.

Today I come to Oslo as a trustee, inspired and with renewed dedication to humanity. I accept this prize on behalf of all men who love peace and brotherhood. I say I come as a trustee, for in the depths of my heart I am aware that this prize is much more than an honor to me personally.

Every time I take a flight, I am always mindful of the many people who make a successful journey possible – the known pilots and the unknown ground crew.

So you honor the dedicated pilots of our struggle who have sat at the controls as the freedom movement soared into orbit. You honor, once again, Chief Lutuli of South Africa, whose struggles with and for his people, are still met with the most brutal expression of man’s inhumanity to man. You honor the ground crew without whose labor and sacrifices the jet flights to freedom could never have left the earth. Most of these people will never make the headline and their names will not appear in Who’s Who. Yet when years have rolled past and when the blazing light of truth is focused on this marvelous age in which we live – men and women will know and children will be taught that we have a finer land, a better people, a more noble civilization – because these humble children of God were willing to suffer for righteousness’ sake.

… peace is more precious than diamonds or silver or gold.

I think Alfred Nobel would know what I mean when I say that I accept this award in the spirit of a curator of some precious heirloom which he holds in trust for its true owners – all those to whom beauty is truth and truth beauty – and in whose eyes the beauty of genuine brotherhood and peace is more precious than diamonds or silver or gold.

An Interview Of Trace Lara Hentz.

By Jerry Alatalo

race Lara Hentz, editor of Lara Blog here on WordPress, has graciously accepted an invitation to participate in the new interview series we began recently. She offers an impressive, unique voice and perspective which readers will appreciate, and adds valuable perceptual contrast to the worldview spectrum compiled from the excellent contributions by previous guest interviewees.

Thank you Trace Lara Hentz for kindly sharing your insights, found in the following words.

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An Interview with Trace Lara Hentz (journalist-author-blogger)

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Question 1.) What was your primary motivation for entering the world of blogging on the worldwide web – the internet?

Thank you very much for this invitation.

In 2009, I joined the blogworld, first using Google Blogger. Experts say if you have a book, you must blog. Well good. That is great advice if you are a writer-author, but technically speaking, there are a million little things you won’t know about blogging until you have blogged awhile. Take sidebars and widgets, for example. That first blog: American Indian Adoptees [www.splitfeathers.blogspot.com] has hit ¾ million reads in 2017. And we’re in the top 100 adoption blogs. I’d say it’s because we are providing vital history, support and information to Native American and First Nations adoptees like myself. I found a niche and know my audience.

Soon after my book, I decided to try WordPress and I’m coming up on my 7th anniversary (January 2018) doing my Lara blog [www.laratracehentz.wordpress.com] for more serious writing. Time does fly. And I do blog experiments on blogger, just for fun. A few years ago I taught both blogger and WordPress at the local community college here in western Massachusetts, along with Social Media 101. They fit together like a glove. Sharing is important, as well as having good solid interesting information on your blog.

One thing I told my students is to blog/write once a week. More than that, you might get blogger-fatigue.

Question 2.) How would you describe yourself with regard to spirituality – what were some of the most memorable transforming points across the years (books, personal contacts, mystical experiences, etc.) in the developing of your current spiritual perspective?

In my early 20s, I embarked on a spiritual quest. Being adopted, for me, meant searching for people and answers. Over many years, I worked to reconnect and find relatives. Along the way, I’ve had meaningful experiences in ceremony, in the sweatlodge, doing purification before the Sundance in Rosebud, South Dakota in the 1990s. I studied with a Northern Cheyenne in Seattle prior to the ceremony, and he helped me with contacting the medicine man who was running it. You need permission to attend and you need to know what to expect, what to bring, etc. One of the most important things I learned: do not pray for yourself in the sweat. It’s not for me to say what I experienced, but it changed my life and improved my health. On that trip, I visited an Oglala Lakota family in Porcupine, SD, and soon became a relative (a member of their family). Sitting at Ellowyn’s kitchen table, I learned so many things, historic things, significant things, huge things, not found in any book.

The 90s were very big years for me. In Seattle where I was living, I met with a Face Reader who was Sikh. And my Kinesiologist-Herbalist was also a Sikh. Both men were healers, definitely, and both started healing the broken parts of me. I chose to do co-counseling (trauma therapy) for three years, which was transformative. The goal: tell your whole life story, in your own words, without holding back. It’s like an inner powder keg exploded. Since then I’ve studied herbal medicine and seek out holistic doctors for treatment. Even after all that personal growth, writing my memoir produced the biggest results in my mental health and outlook. The key is: “Know Thyself.”

The one book I recommend to everyone is John Fire Lame Deer Seeker of Visions. If you feel a need to understand Indian Country traditions, and the work of medicine men, particularly the Lakota Oyate (Nation), this is the book to read.

Question 3.) What is your greatest wish for readers as a consequence after reading and considering your writings?

My greatest wish is for those who read my blog is to be excited, and learn something new and unexpected. I share news from Indian Country, my perspective on being adopted, and I write and curate history and current events.

In case readers don’t know, it took me five long years to write my memoir, prior to my first blog. Good Grief! The one thing I had not fully realized with doing a memoir or biography, I needed to write in the first person and share my own story and the long search for my father. I was writing mostly Indian Country history in the book as a journalist. Then a literary agent read it and made recommendations. Writing friends told me similar. That started a major rewrite and a new process, while emotionally processing all of it. Writing can be a very healing thing, even writing on a blog, but it can also take you down a path you won’t expect. In those five years, I healed more than I ever dreamt possible.

Writing my first full-length book was synchronicity, very well-timed. After my memoir came out, I’ve done a four-part book series on the Lost Children of the Indian Adoption Projects, narratives from adoptees in North America and the 60s Scoop in Canada. And I have contributed to other books on the topic of adoption.

I hope that readers who visit my Lara blog will be glad to read about Indian Country. What is news-worthy to me might be news-worthy to you.

For those new to this blog world, as you blog, you will change and evolve. Remember, it’s your words and experience that people will want to read.

Question 4.) Can you offer any advice to people having a difficult time dealing with government and media lies, especially as it pertains to so many average citizens who hold erroneous perceptions on important events and situations around the Earth?

If 2017 feels like a beginning, 2018 will be even more so. Yup, hold onto your hat!

It is very apparent in 2017, this is a surreal time for many Americans. The Hopi and many tribes predicted this time would come. It is a very important time, in that we are waking up and seeing things in a whole new light, with some shock and outrage and fear thrown in. History (his-story) happens in cycles, so we need to learn world history, so we can see events happening today in a historical sense, and that way discern the truth from the lies. If we don’t discern, we are doomed to repeat until we do learn. I fully understand the constant news-cycle can be too much to handle… News might cause distress and bitter arguments among friends and family. That means we need to find new words, good words, better words, and to listen carefully.

I trained as a journalist in 1996 and took my first salaried job as an editor that year. Prior to that I freelanced and kept journals. Something I find most distressing today is so much history and world news is not taught in school, or included in history textbooks. There are huge chunks of history missing, mis-told, or told in a very biased, one-sided, colonized, misogynistic manner. Bloggers can change that, and I hope they will.

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(BIO) Known for her exceptional print interviews with influential Native Americans such as Leonard Peltier, John Trudell and Floyd Red Crow Westerman, Trace Lara Hentz (who legally dropped the name DeMeyer in 2014) started intensive research on adoptees in 2004. Her memoir ONE SMALL SACRIFICE is an exposé on the systematic removal of American Indian children from their mothers, families and tribes for adoption into non-Indian families while she weaves in her own personal story. Her adoptee journey takes her around the country, finally meeting her birthfather in 1994 and learning about her mixed ancestry (Cherokee-Shawnee-Delaware-French Canadian.) Trace is former editor of tribal newspapers the Pequot Times and Ojibwe Akiing. She has contributed to adoption anthologies: Lost Daughters, Adoption Reunion in the Age of Social Media, and Adoptionland: From Orphans to Activists. In 2013, she was co-editor of the anthology Unraveling the Spreading Cloth of Time: Indigenous Thoughts Concerning the Universe with MariJo Moore. She is currently writing history with her cousin Dr. Charles Bland on one of their cousins Dr. Thomas Augustus Bland, editor of Council Fire, and a friend of Red Cloud and Sitting Bull.

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Thank you again, Trace Lara Hentz. Peace.