“A Hidden Life”: Review By Edward Curtin.

(Cross-posted from DissidentVoice.org)

Painting A True Christ

A review of Terrence Malik’s film: A Hidden Life

by Edward Curtin / February 14th, 2020

here’s an early scene in Terrence Malik’s masterful new film – what I would call a moving painting – where the central character Franz Jägerstätter, an Austrian peasant farmer from an isolated small mountainous village who refuses to take an oath to Hitler and fight in the German army, is talking to an older man who is restoring paintings in the local Catholic church.

Franz, a devout Roman Catholic, is deeply disturbed by the rise of Hitler and the thought of participating in his immoral killing machine.  The older man tells Franz – who has already been admonished that he has a duty to defend the fatherland (homeland) – that he makes his living painting pretty holy pictures for the culturally conditioned parishioners for whom God and country are synonymous.  He says.

“I paint their comfortable Christ with a halo over his head.  We love him, that’s enough.  Someday I’ll paint a true Christ.”

Malik’s “someday” has arrived with A Hidden Life, where the older Malik shows the younger Malik – and us – a moving picture of what experience has taught him is the complex essence of a true and simple Christ: out of love of God and all human beings to refuse to kill.

To watch this film is to undergo a profound experience, an experiment with truth and non-violence, a three-hour trial (Latin: experimentum – trial).  While Franz is eventually put on trial by the German government, it is we as viewers who must judge ourselves and ask how guilty or innocent are we for supporting or resisting the immoral killing machine of our own country now.

Hitler and his Nazis were then, but we are faced with what Martin Luther King called “the fierce urgency of now.”  Many Americans surely ask with Franz, “What has happened to the country that we love?”  But how many look in the mirror and ask, “Am I a guilty bystander or an active supporter of the United States’ immoral and illegal wars all around the world that have been going on for so many years under presidents of both parties and have no end?

Do I support the new cold war with its push for nuclear war with its first strike policy?  Do I support, by my silence, a nuclear holocaust?”

I say that A Hidden Life is a moving painting because its form and content cannot be separated.  A true artist, Malik realizes that what non-artists call form or style is the content; they are one.  The essence of the story is in the telling; in a film in the showing. The cinematography by Jörge Widmer, a longtime Malick collaborator, is therefore key.  It is exquisitely beautiful as he paints with swiftly moving light the mountains and streams of the Austrian countryside, even as the storm clouds with their thunder and lightning roll in across the mountains.

The ever-recurring dramatic scenes of numinous nature and the focus on the sustaining earth from which our food comes and to which we all return and in which Franz, his wife Fani, and their young daughters romp and roll and plant and harvest and dirty their hands is the ground beneath our feet, and when we look, we see its marriage to the sky, the clouds, the light, the shadows, which in their iridescent interplay of light and darkness beseech us to interrogate our existence and ask with Franz what is right and what is wrong and what is our purpose on this beautiful earth.

Continue reading ““A Hidden Life”: Review By Edward Curtin.”

Peace Activist History Ph.D. Reveals All.

By Jerry Alatalo

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“The chief event of life is the day in which we have encountered a mind that startled us.”

– RALPH WALDO EMERSON (1803-1882) American poet, Unitarian minister, philosopher

Ganser-1
Dr. Daniele Ganser starts his lecture before a packed auditorium.

istory Professor Daniele Ganser is a teacher many have wished they had while in school, and one suspects they will become joined by many others after hearing him speak. To accentuate our admiration for Dr. Ganser, we would say his teaching style is simple, direct and shows a concern for reaching the student or listener with a maximum of facts and minimum of extraneous or irrelevant tangential information.

To use a baseball hitting analogy, one might suggest that Daniele Ganser has an extremely high batting average as a teacher, where comparisons to the great Boston Red Sox .400 hitter Ted Williams – Williams nicknamed “The Splendid Splinter” – are perfectly in order.

We would like to share a selection of some of our comments on YouTube from the past (3) months illustrative of our strong alignment to the worldview of Professor Ganser, and to help emphasize our equally strong appreciation for his peace activism efforts and moral courage.

Dr. Ganser’s powerful lecture follows …

Continue reading “Peace Activist History Ph.D. Reveals All.”