Nobel Peace Prize Address: Nuclear States Issued Historic Challenge.

(Transcript cross-posted from NobelPrize.org)

International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) – Nobel Lecture

NORWAY – International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) leaders Setsuko Thurlow (center) and Beatrice Fihn (right) accept the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize

Nobel Lecture given by the Nobel Peace Prize Laureate 2017, ICAN, delivered by Beatrice Fihn and Setsuko Thurlow, Oslo, 10 December 2017.

[Beatrice Fihn:]

Your Majesties,
Members of the Norwegian Nobel Committee,
Esteemed guests,

Today, it is a great honor to accept the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of thousands of inspirational people who make up the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.

Together we have brought democracy to disarmament and are reshaping international law.
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We most humbly thank the Norwegian Nobel Committee for recognizing our work and giving momentum to our crucial cause.

We want to recognize those who have so generously donated their time and energy to this campaign.

We thank the courageous foreign ministers, diplomats, Red Cross and Red Crescent staff, UN officials, academics and experts with whom we have worked in partnership to advance our common goal.

And we thank all who are committed to ridding the world of this terrible threat.
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At dozens of locations around the world – in missile silos buried in our earth, on submarines navigating through our oceans, and aboard planes flying high in our sky – lie 15,000 objects of humankind’s destruction.

Perhaps it is the enormity of this fact, perhaps it is the unimaginable scale of the consequences, that leads many to simply accept this grim reality. To go about our daily lives with no thought to the instruments of insanity all around us.

For it is insanity to allow ourselves to be ruled by these weapons. Many critics of this movement suggest that we are the irrational ones, the idealists with no grounding in reality. That nuclear-armed states will never give up their weapons.

But we represent the only rational choice. We represent those who refuse to accept nuclear weapons as a fixture in our world, those who refuse to have their fates bound up in a few lines of launch code.

Ours is the only reality that is possible. The alternative is unthinkable.

The story of nuclear weapons will have an ending, and it is up to us what that ending will be.

Will it be the end of nuclear weapons, or will it be the end of us?

One of these things will happen.

The only rational course of action is to cease living under the conditions where our mutual destruction is only one impulsive tantrum away.
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Today I want to talk of three things: fear, freedom, and the future.

Continue reading “Nobel Peace Prize Address: Nuclear States Issued Historic Challenge.”

Moralizing International Politics.

(Originally posted at Transcend International)

Moralizing International Politics

BY TRANSCEND MEMBERS, 4 Dec 2017

Dr. Debidatta Aurobinda Mahapatra – TRANSCEND Media Service

This article makes an appeal to bridge the chasm between the practice of international politics and the universal moral principles. Violation of moral principles has emerged a norm than exception in international politics. States and global institutions have proved ineffective to checkmate violent conflicts and wanton killings as in Syria. It is not they are incapable or lack resources. The problem lies elsewhere. Ego is a major cause behind much of the hazards in international politics. The article problematizes ego and calls for a broader thinking in international politics.  

Ban Ki-moon, the former head of the United Nations, expressed the frustration of our age. He lamented: “It should shame us all…the suffering of the Syrian people continues to plumb new depths … The international community, and in particular the Security Council, cannot afford to waste any further time in ending the cycle of violence… it is time to find an exit from this madness” (The United Nations 2015). Syria provides a stark example before us how states and global institutions have proved ineffective to ensure international peace and security. Within a span of six years since the crisis erupted, more than 400,000 people lost lives and unaccountable others uprooted. The powerful states in the United Nations flexed muscles over means to realize peace. Peace remained elusive.

One of the factors that contribute to the ineffectiveness of the international community and its leaders is the technological-moral chasm. There has been rapid growth in technology, particularly the communication technology, but the thinking pattern has not witnessed parallel growth. The old primordial way of thinking has not changed. The archetypal thinking in terms of binaries – mine vs thine, us vs them, my group vs rival group – has not evolved over centuries though major changes appeared in the structure and organization of human living. This thinking has produced a paradox. In the midst of developed technology, globalization and discourses of a flat and borderless world, the states are engaged in re-bordering practices. Technology has been used to rigidify barriers – us vs them – through narrow visions of security. Both hard power and soft power are used to strengthen these binaries in thinking and practice.

Does seclusion/isolation help? Is an isolated state immune from insecurity beyond its borders? In this age of globalization, how would states ensure safety at home when there is violence outside? The global concerns such as terrorism, religious extremism and climate change transcend state borders. Isolation as a foreign policy strategy might have worked in the past, but in the contemporary world isolation implies invitation to more problems. A small happening in a small part of the globe can shape international developments. How would erecting barriers ensure security of one state while other states undergo violent crises? Does eerie calm imply peace? When minds are disturbed, security is fragile, peace is uneasy, when we have blatantly messed up with Nature, how would we ensure the survival of human race in the decades and centuries to come?

The states spend billions of dollars in building weapons, while vouching disarmament. States spent around 1686 billion US dollars on defense in 2016. Contrast this figure with another figure: from 2014 to 2016, about 795 million people in the world suffered from chronic undernourishment. Is it not a violation of human moral principle to invest billions in weapons to secure people and borders while people remain hungry?

Indian philosopher Sri Aurobindo argued, like individuals, states have egos– amplified through national habits, prejudices and idiosyncrasies (Sri Aurobindo 1962). When applied to international politics, they lead to jingoism, exploitation and wars, leading to practices like colonialism and imperialism. Colonialism and imperialism, one of the worst forms of exploitation, have ended. However, they were only manifestation of an exploitative substructure. The root, the ego, is intact, and its manifestation has acquired new shapes. The Indian philosopher argued that state ego could evolve when state leaders think in terms of larger human unity and harmony. The establishment of the United Nations, after the failure of the League of Nations, was hailed as a right step in this direction. The UN was established with a promise to ensure dignity and equality to all states. Has this happened?

If the ultimate goal of human life is peace and security, then the theories of international politics have not fared well. Grand theorizing might provide a big picture and offer plausible explanations of developments, but they largely fail to account small developments at small places with big implications. Should not theories suggest ways to address state egos and its various avatars? Explaining developments in retrospect maybe useful as it offers insights for future action, but unless there is an active agenda to realize global peace, the theories would be limiting in their usefulness. Social science theories, dealing with human beings and their behaviors, stand in contrast to physical science theories, which deal with matter, mostly insentient. The post-behavioralism trend in political science that emerged in late 1960s due to ‘deep dissatisfaction in political research and teaching’ called for ‘new strategies in science’. David Easton in his presidential address at American Political Science Association in 1969 called for “the development of new norm of behavior” as the post-behavioral trend “sees policy engagement as a social responsibility of the intellectual…” He further agued, “Someday it may also require the release of the social scientist from bondage to the unique needs and objectives of his own national political system” (Easton 1969, 1061). The trend, however, petered out quickly. Now is the time to revive this trend.

Some theories suggest that the world has become a better place to live since inter-state wars have declined. Are we living in a more secure and peaceful world? What about wars within communities and states and their international ramifications? How does one define conflict in Syria – intrastate, interstate or both, or a more dangerous face of traditional rivalries? Thousands of fault lines along regions, religions, races, ethnicities have emerged. Even the threat of interstate wars with a nuclear angle cannot be undermined. The present crisis can be compared to a can of worms, with worms – multiple conflicts at various levels – continuously crawl out, in all shapes, sizes and colors and challenge individuals and states alike.

The dilemma over pleasure, happiness and peace was well depicted in the life of the Greek philosopher Diogenes. The philosopher asked the Emperor Alexander, who offered him all comforts of life, not to block sun light and that was all what he needed from him. With a lantern in his hand, Diogenes searched for an honest man. This act may defy rational understanding, but it contains a deeper message, which can help salvage humanity from the multiple crises. Pretensions, subterfuges, and other instruments meant for tangential gains bring hazards in its trail and harm the perpetrator. Gandhi’s caution rings true: “For one man cannot do right in one department of life whilst he is occupied in doing wrong in any other department. Life is one indivisible whole” (Gandhi 1969, 571).

A report titled, “Welcome to Miami, Massachusetts” claimed that if the greenhouse gas emission continues at the current rate, “… by 2100 Boston’s average summer-high temperatures will likely be more than 10 degrees Fahrenheit hotter than they are now, ‘making it feel as steamy as North Miami Beach is today’” (Annear 2014). A large iceberg of the size of Delaware broke off from an ice shelf in Antarctica in July 2017. According to a report, “global warming has pushed temperatures up to 5 degrees higher in the region since the 1950s and could increase up to 7 degrees more by the end of the century, putting more stress on the ice” (Rice 2017). Tony de Brum, the former Marshall Islands Foreign Minister, nominated for Nobel Peace Prize for his role in Paris Climate agreement, died recently at the age of 72. Brum witnessed the ‘Bravo shot,’ the thermonuclear test at Bikini Atoll when he was 9 years old. He became a champion of nuclear disarmament and environment protection. Brum, whose island home went under waters due to rising ocean, argued, “The thought of evacuation is repulsive to us…We think that the more reasonable thing to do is to seek to end this madness, this climate madness, where people think that smaller, vulnerable countries are expendable and therefore they can continue to do business as usual” (The Guardian 2017). Gandhi’s ‘Nature has for everyone’s need but not for everyone’s greed’ provides a powerful message. Unless the very basic thinking of states and their leaders change, it will be difficult to moralize international politics.

Plato devised a scheme of governance in which the king, the modern equivalent of president/prime minister, must be a philosopher. The king must undergo decades of education to govern the state. The king and his class must rise above the notions of mine and thine, live a communal life, eat in common kitchen, transcend boundaries of family and group, and become free to dedicate his life to state. Applying the Platonic yardstick to modern day kings, leaders of modern states, may appear farfetched, but it provides a vision how a leader should govern a state.

For moralizing international politics, one state does not have to dominate or be dominated. Morality requires collective conscience and action. The states, through their leaders, need to develop an integral moral psychology that informs social, economic and political worlds as they interact and shape each other. Powerful states may provide leadership in this direction.

References:

Annear, Steve (2014) Welcome to Miami, Massachusetts. Boston Daily, July 11, http://www.bostonmagazine.com/news/blog/2014/07/11/climate-central-map-heat-boston-miami/, accessed 4 July 2017.

Easton, David (1969) The New Revolution in Political Science. The American Political Science Review; 63 (4):1051-1061.

Gandhi, Mahatma (1969) The Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi Vol. 32. New Delhi: The Publications Division, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Government of India.

Rice, Doyle (2017) Massive iceberg nearly the size of Delaware breaks off Antarctica. USA Today, 12 July, https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/sciencefair/2017/07/12/massive-iceberg-breaks-off-antarctica/102637874/, accessed 4 July 2017.

Sri Aurobindo (1962) Human Cycle, the Ideal of Human Unity, War and Self-Determination. Pondicherry: Sri Aurobindo Ashram.

The Guardian (2017) Tony de Brum, champion of Paris climate agreement, dies aged 72, 23 August,https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/aug/23/tony-de-brum-champion-of-paris-climate-agreement-dies-aged-72, accessed 24 August 2017.

The United Nations (2015) Statement by the Secretary-General on the Third Anniversary of the Geneva Communique on Syria.  30 June, http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2015/06/30/world/middleeast/ap-un-united-nations-syria.html, accessed 5 August 2017.

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Dr Debidatta Aurobinda Mahapatra is a member of the TRANSCEND Network, Director of the Mahatma Gandhi Center for Non-Violence, Human Rights and World Peace at Hindu University of America in Florida, and a Fellow at the Center for Peace, Democracy and Development, University of Massachusetts Boston. He is an Indian commentator and his areas of interest include conflict transformation and peacebuilding in South and Central Asia. His edited book Conflict and Peace in Eurasia was published by Routledge in 2013.

 

This article originally appeared on Transcend Media Service (TMS) on 4 Dec 2017.

Anticopyright: Editorials and articles originated on TMS may be freely reprinted, disseminated, translated and used as background material, provided an acknowledgement and link to the source,TMS: Moralizing International Politics, is included. Thank you.

An Interview Of Santosh Krinsky.

By Jerry Alatalo

r. Santosh Krinsky, editor of Sri Aurobindo Studies here at WordPress, has kindly given a positive response to our invitation to participate in an interview. Thank you Santosh for sharing your thoughts in the following words.

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Question 1…) What was your primary motivation for entering the world of blogging on the worldwide web – on the internet?

Having heard for years how difficult it was for many people to delve into the writings of Sri Aurobindo, and their consequent lack of knowledge about the issues raised and covered in those writings, and having personally determined that I wanted to find a way to deepen my own appreciation by a steady, systematic review, I combined the intention of a daily study session with the idea of blogging to allow others to participate if they felt so inclined, in this process. 

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Question 2…) How would you describe yourself with regard to spirituality? What were some of the most memorable transforming points across the years (books, personal contacts, mystical experiences, etc.) in the developing of your current spiritual perspective?

I distinguish spirituality from any form of religious practice.  For myself a spiritual life is about recognizing the oneness and inter-connectedness of all life and existence, and then working to transform thoughts, emotions, and actions to express the recognition of that oneness.  During that process, the essential mystical experience is one that opens the heart and mind to the beauty and underlying harmony of existence, which can arise at any time and under any circumstances, whether in solitude walking in a forest, or in the midst of activity of daily life. 

As to memorable transforming moments, the first time I was given a copy of Sri Aurobindo’s The Life Divine certainly counts as one of those moments.  When I opened it randomly and read the first few paragraphs, I suddenly recognized a connection which has continued now for over 46 years!  Another was when I was residing for a period of time at the Sri Aurobindo Ashram in Pondicherry India in 1973 and experienced the Mahasamadhi of Sri Aurobindo’s co-worker The Mother in November 1973.  The events of that time went deep into my psyche and helped me to take a new direction and attitude in my life.

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Question 3…) What is your greatest wish for readers as a consequence after reading/considering your writings?

In the end, no amount of reading can replace the actual inner opening and practice of the spiritual principles.   The daily blog post may be a way for readers to step out of their normal hectic lives for a few moments to reflect on how to integrate their spiritual quest in their lives, and if it has that result, I would be gratified. 

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Question 4…and final) Can you offer any advice to people having a difficult time dealing with government and media lies, especially as it pertains to so many average citizens who hold erroneous perceptions on important events and situations around the Earth.

I find this message from Sri Aurobindo to be essential:   “live within, be not shaken by outward happenings”.   The evolution of consciousness on the planet continues, just as life evolved out of matter, and mind evolved out of life, the next phase of development of consciousness is underway.  One of the hallmarks of this process is the revealing and exposure of the falsehoods and deceptions that have built up under the framework of physical denseness, vital aggressiveness and mental separation.  As the awareness of oneness takes hold, secrets get revealed and all people and institutions of society are impacted.  Those holding power try to hold on using “any means necessary” which causes considerable short-term suffering.  The ongoing force of the spiritual transformation however eventually will be able to gain the upper hand and usher in a new vision that treats the planet with respect, and which recognizes the oneness of all people and does not get bogged down in the mental distinctions of race, religion, gender, class, etc. which so burden all of humanity in today’s world. 

Eventually the deceptions must be revealed.  What is occurring in the modern world is essentially no different than what has happened throughout the vital and mental phases of human evolution, only that the powers of mass media and corporatism  provide added leverage to those seeking to hold power over others and undertake the “self-dealing” that creates enormous suffering in the world for those who are prevented from having access to the world’s resources.  Yet we see an ever growing force of “truth-consciousness” which is beginning to peel back the layers of obscuration and deception so that we become more aware of it.  Awareness is the first stage for any real change of consciousness.  Thus we can see that persistence and patience, understanding and goodwill, and providing an example of action from the state of oneness are the powers that each person who awakens at this critical juncture needs to put into practice.  Speak truth, act with honor, hold goodwill and compassion in one’s heart, and have confidence that the evolutionary process proceeds apace to spread a new power of consciousness that will be able to bring forth the harmony that is so desperately needed in the world.

Actually one thing occurred to me that people everywhere can do along these lines:

People can take active steps to recognize the oneness of all of humanity by building bridges between people of different cultures and religions, sharing and appreciating what strengths each of them bring with them, and looking behind the differences to see the common humanity.  This may involve visiting, participating in and honoring the practices of various religions or spiritual paths, reaching out to people who are disadvantaged and working actively to ease their suffering, as well as acting as a thought-leader in one’s own circles to counter-act bigotry and racism, class consciousness and prejudice with a deeper conviction and insight into the common circumstances of all humanity. 

Similarly, working toward respecting all species who share the planet, and working toward respecting the planet itself and supporting actions that heal rather than destroy, that bring harmony rather than dissension, are all things that people of good will can do.

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Thank you again, Santosh. Peace.

U.S. Tyranny Of Secrecy, Or A Greater Perfection?

By Jerry Alatalo

he focus of this article is to illustrate a sharp contrast between two worldviews – one which exists at present in 2017, most forcefully in America – and that proposed by one of India’s most revered political and spiritual leaders Sri Aurobindo (1872-1950).

Perhaps afterward, men and women will understand a clear choice between these worldviews reveals the potential of changing conditions for humanity on Earth in profoundly positive ways.

(Update – September 2, 2017: The YouTube video below featuring a shocking presentation by former CIA official Kevin Shipp has surpassed 700,000 views, an amazing increase of 412,000 global views in just 72 hours )

Sri Aurobindo wrote and transmitted the following after receiving a request for a message on the day of his 78th birth anniversary being celebrated in New York on August 15, 1949. Remarkably and coincidentally India, along with Pakistan, achieved independence from the British on August 15, 1947. Sri Aurobindo wrote this message shortly after passage through the United States Congress of the National Security Act of 1947, which resulted in establishment of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).

Whether there was a direct connection between India and Pakistan gaining independence and the push to create the CIA is uncertain, but the historical timing and proximity of the two major world-consequence events leads one to lean towards an explanation that the CIA came to exist in large part as a reaction to those two nations’ becoming independent.

What transpired in 1947 in India, Pakistan and the United States became that era’s foundation-building for later years and history, along with having a direct influence on the process of human evolution up until today. In similar fashion, the choices humanity makes in 2017 creates the foundation and joined consequences of national and international relations for future generations, making the grave nature of choosing wisely fully apparent.

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Sri Aurobindo – August 11, 1949

“I have been asked to send on this occasion of the fifteenth August a message to the West, but what I have to say might be delivered equally as a message to the East. It has been customary to dwell on the division and difference between these two sections of the human family and even oppose them to each other; but, for my­self I would rather be disposed to dwell on oneness and unity than on division and difference.

“East and West have the same human nature, a common human destiny, the same aspiration after a greater perfection, the same seeking after something higher than itself, something towards which inwardly and even outwardly we move. There has been a tendency in some minds to dwell on the spirituality or mysticism of the East and the materialism of the West; but the West has had no less than the East its spiritual seekings and, though not in such profusion, its saints and sages and mystics, the East has had its materialistic tendencies, its material splendours, its similar or identical dealings with life and matter and the world in which we live.

“East and West have always met and mixed more or less closely, they have powerfully influenced each other and at the present day are under an increasing compulsion of nature and fate to do so more than ever before.

“There is a common hope, a common destiny, both spiritual and material, for which both are needed as co-workers. It is no longer towards division and difference that we should turn our minds, but on unity, union, even oneness necessary for the pursuit and realisation of a common ideal, the destined goal, the fulfilment towards which nature in her beginning obscurely set out and must in an increasing light of knowledge replacing her first ignorance constantly persevere.

“But what shall be that ideal and that goal? That depends on our conception of the realities of life and the supreme reality.

“Here we have to take into account that there has been not any absolute difference but an increasing divergence between the tendencies of the East and the West. The highest truth is truth of the spirit; a spirit supreme above the world and yet imma­nent in the world and in all that exists, sustaining and leading all towards whatever is the aim and goal and the fulfilment of nature since her obscure inconscient beginnings through the growth of consciousness is the one aspect of existence which gives a clue to the secret of our being and a meaning to the world.

“The East has always and increasingly put the highest emphasis on the supreme truth of the spirit; it has, even in its extreme philosophies, put the world away as an illusion and regarded the spirit as the sole reality. The West has concentrated more and more increasingly on the world, on the dealings of mind and life with our material existence, on our mastery over it, on the perfection of mind and life and some fulfilment of the human being here: latterly this has gone so far as the denial of the spirit and even the enthronement of matter as the sole reality.

“Spiritual perfection as the sole ideal on one side, on the other, the perfectibility of the race, the perfect society, a perfect development of the human mind and life and man’s material existence have become the largest dream of the future. Yet both are truths and can be regarded as part of the intention of the spirit in world-nature; they are not incompatible with each other: rather their divergence has to be healed and both have to be included and reconciled in our view of the future.

“The science of the West has discovered evolution as the secret of life and its process in this material world; but it has laid more stress on the growth of form and species than on the growth of consciousness: even, consciousness has been regarded as an incident and not the whole secret of the meaning of the evolution.

“An evolution has been admitted by certain minds in the East, certain philosophies and scriptures, but there its sense has been the growth of the soul through developing or successive forms and many lives of the individual to its own highest reality.

“For if there is a conscious being in the form, that being can hardly be a temporary phenomenon of consciousness; it must be a soul fulfilling itself and this fulfilment can only take place if there is a return of the soul to earth in many successive lives, in many successive bodies. The process of evolution has been the development from and in inconscient matter of a subconscient and then a conscious life, of conscious mind first in animal life and then fully in conscious and thinking man, the highest present achievement of evolutionary nature.

“The achievement of mental being is at present her highest and tends to be regarded as her final work; but it is possible to conceive a still further step of the evolution: nature may have in view beyond the imperfect mind of man a consciousness that passes out of the mind’s ignorance and possesses truth as its inherent right and nature. There is a truth-consciousness as it is called in the Veda, a Supermind, as I have termed it, possessing knowledge, not having to seek after it and constantly miss it.

“In one of the Upanishads a being of knowledge is stated to be the next step above the mental being; into that the soul has to rise and through it to attain the perfect bliss of spiritual existence. If that could be achieved as the next evolutionary step of nature here, then she would be fulfilled and we could conceive of the perfection of life even here, its attainment of a full spiritual living even in this body or it may be in a perfected body.

“We could even speak of a divine life on earth; our human dream of perfectibility would be accomplished and at the same time the aspiration to a heaven on earth common to several religions and spiritual seers and thinkers.

“The ascent of the human soul to the supreme Spirit is that soul’s highest aim and necessity, for that is the supreme reality; but there can be too the descent of the spirit and its powers into the world and that would justify the existence of the material world also, give a meaning, a divine purpose to the creation and solve its riddle.

“East and West could be reconciled in the pursuit of the highest and largest ideal. Spirit embrace matter and matter find its own true reality, and the hidden reality in all things in the spirit.”

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Recently, former CIA counter-terrorism expert Kevin Shipp gave what could only be described as a jaw-dropping, extremely distressing presentation on the history and current operative state of America’s “shadow government”. Since posted at his colleague and fellow social activist Dane Wigington’s YouTube channel on August 23, 2017, Mr. Shipp’s presentation has compiled views by 288,672 (at the time of this writing on August 31) men and women around the Earth.

During the 1-hour and 7-minute, fast paced presentation, Mr. Shipp brings forward an astounding number of shocking facts of which a large majority of Americans, along with citizens in nations around the world, are (thus far) unfortunately unaware. It is difficult after seeing and hearing what he shows and states – perhaps an impossibility – to reach any conclusion otherwise than the facts/information revealed are of utmost importance, thus necessitating from a moral perspective the widest dissemination.

Without going into any analyses of the excruciating points covered in Mr. Shipp’s devastatingly powerful talk, or repeating the many facts and details he conveys, suffice to say the profoundly serious implications are painfully and clearly self-evident for any rational man or woman who takes in the information. Contrasting the worldview of those who have been or are now involved in America’s shadow government and/or deep state – what Kevin Shipp accurately terms a “Tyranny of Secrecy” – to the worldview put forth by India’s spiritual leader Sri Aurobindo in 1949 results in one’s recognizing an ever-present, challenging and often difficult situation for humanity – of choosing as wisely as possible the historical path forward.

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Up until 1910 in early national struggles for helping his native India to achieve independence, Sri Aurobindo was an active participant in political affairs and efforts toward that precise end. He became sentenced to a prison term by British authorities, and it was in prison where he experienced personal, mystical events resulting in his turning from political to spiritual matters for the remaining 40 years of his life. He wrote the following during time spent in early efforts focused on India’s attainment of national sovereignty:

“For in truth, as our old thinkers used always to insist, the whole universe stands; truth is the root and condition of life and to believe in a lie, to live a lie, is to deliver oneself to disease and death. The belief that a subject nation can acquiesce in subjection and yet make true and vital progress, growing to strength in its chains. is a lie”.

He turned from political matters in 1910, 37 years before India became a free nation, moving on toward many years of spiritual studies and prolific levels of philosophical writing, until his passing in 1950 at the age of 79. In one of his many and voluminous writings he touched upon the necessity for any spiritual seeker to develop sincerity:

“That is why we must insist so much on sincerity in the yoga – and that means to have all the being consciously turned toward the one truth, the one divine. But that for human nature is one of the most difficult of tasks, much more difficult than a rigid asceticism or a fervent piety. Religion itself does not give this complete harmonized sincerity – it is only the psychic being and the one-souled spiritual aspiration that can give it”.

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One can only imagine what Sri Aurobindo would say were he alive now in 2017, and in particular after assessing the current state of human affairs as described by Kevin Shipp and others. Of course such a wish represents something outside the realm of possibility, yet his books are available, providing valuable philosophical and spiritual insights and guidance.

Sri Aurobindo would advise this generation in 2017 to make wise evolutionary decisions.

(Thank you to Dane Wigington at YouTube)