President Tulsi Gabbard?: “There Is No Force More Powerful Than Love.”

(Editorial comment: Hawaii’s elected representative to Congress Tulsi Gabbard’s February 2, 2019 address announcing her candidacy for President of the United States in 2020 was remarkable in many ways, but what separated her most from Donald Trump and others who’ve publicly conveyed their intentions of running was one statement by Ms. Gabbard: “There is no force more powerful than love.”

If one were to imagine Donald Trump, Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton, Joe Biden etc. being asked by journalists the following question: “How do you feel about the idea, suggested by Ms. Gabbard, that there is no more powerful force than love?”, then one might better understand why the just-born Tulsi Gabbard campaign and movement has immense potential for success.

In the history of United States presidential politics, unless mistaken (and we don’t believe so), such a reference by a candidate to high-consciousness spiritual wisdom implying the feasibility of real, transformation-producing, global spiritual evolution as Tulsi Gabbard did during her speech is without precedent, – in other words, even when taking into consideration the massive compilation of speeches … new.

Tulsi Gabbard has simply, boldly and courageously raised the bar higher than ever before, arguably where the U.S. presidential debate bar should always have been, rightly, from the start. Donald Trump and the other candidates’ advisers and public relations experts will find it very difficult, if not impossible, to refute and/or overpower the essential, morality-based, profoundly compelling message just sent from Hawaii. End of editorial comment)

 

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(Transcript of Tulsi Gabbard’s February 2, 2019 presidential campaign announcement address comes from Tulsi2020.com)

Aloha.

Thank you so much.

Growing up here in Hawaii, I loved swimming, surfing, and having fun in this paradise we are lucky to call home.

But I gradually realized that I was actually happiest when I was doing things for other people, doing things to protect our water, oceans, and beaches.

This was a different kind of happiness than what I experienced when just thinking of myself. It was a deeper happiness, that stayed with me.

I knew that no matter what path I chose in life, I wanted service to be the foundation.

I am proud to serve our country as a soldier.  I’m a Major in the Army National Guard where I’ve served for the last 15 years.

I’m so grateful to have had the opportunity to serve the people of Hawaii and our country in so many ways over the years –, in the state house where I was elected at 21, serving 100,000 people as a member of the Honolulu City Council, and now for over 6 years in Congress.

Thank you for your trust and your aloha.

I’m a Major in the Army National Guard, where I’ve served for the last 15 years. a Major in the National Guard and proud to serve as a soldier, a Major in the National Guard, proud to serve our country as a soldier.  I enlisted nearly 15 years ago in the Army National Guard, and deployed twice to the Middle East.

Our nation was founded on the principle that our government should be of the people, by the people, and for the people — where all people are treated equally, and with respect, in these UNITED states of America.
But today that vision seems like a far off dream.

Hatred and divisiveness have cast a dark shadow across our country.

We are being torn apart by powerful, self-serving politicians and greedy corporations, inciting hatred, fear, and conflict between us because of the color of our skin, the way we worship, or our political party.

This corruption of spirit driven by greed and selfishness is eroding the very fabric of our society …  and democracy itself.

This is not who we are, America.

The best of our nation is exemplified by our nation’s veterans who embody what it means to put service above self.  Who have sacrificed their own personal interests out of a greater love for our people and our country.

Love is not just a feeling.  It is a powerful force that drives us to act, to put service above self.

Our men and women in uniform, generation after generation, motivated by love for one another and for our country have been  willing to sacrifice  everything … for us.

They don’t  raise their hand and volunteer to serve  just to fight for one religion but not another; people of one race but not another; people of one political party but not another.

No.

When  we raise our right hand and volunteer to serve, we set aside our own interests — to serve our country and to fight for ALL Americans.

We serve as one —  Indivisible and unbreakable, united by  this bond of  love for  each other and love for our country.

It is this principle of putting service above self, that is at the heart of every soldier, every service member.

And it is in this spirit that today I announce my candidacy for President of the United States of America.

I will bring a soldier’s principles to the White House — restoring the values of dignity, honor and respect to the presidency. And above all, love for our people and love of country.

I ask you to join me, in this spirit of putting service before self, to stand up against the forces of greed and corruption.

The road ahead will not be easy.

The battle will be tough, the obstacles great.

But I know that when we stand united, by our love for our people and our country, there is no obstacle we cannot overcome, there is no battle we cannot win.

John F. Kennedy once said, “Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country.” 

We must heed his call to action today, at this critical time in our history.

We must stand up, and fight for the soul of our country.

Continue reading “President Tulsi Gabbard?: “There Is No Force More Powerful Than Love.””

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Dimash: The Greatest Vocalist On Earth?

by Jerry Alatalo

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“Art is not a pleasure, or an amusement; art is a great matter. Art is an organ of human life transmitting man’s reasonable perception into feeling.” What is Art? 

– LEO TOLSTOY (1828-1910) Russian writer*

*(On Tolstoy)”No man deserves to be called a genius, no man is more complex, more contradictory, more admirable than he in all things, yes, in all things … He is a man who envelops all men, a man – mankind.” – Maksim Gorki (1868-1936) Russian novelist, playwright

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hank you and tip of the hat to peace activist, documentary filmmaker and 9/11 truth advocate Charles Ewing Smith for posting a video of the amazing male singer from Kazakhstan, Dimash Kudaibergen. We were thankful to “stumble across” the artistic phenomenon at Charles’ YouTube channel. Singing and studying classical music from the age of (5), the now 24-year old Dimash possesses an amazing range of (6) octaves and could credibly be positioned near the top of great vocalists, male or female, of this or any generation in history.

Having only heard of Dimash Kudaibergen today January 12, 2019, one finds it astonishing that the young man’s name isn’t already known worldwide, and mentioned in the same breath as American superstar entertainers Elvis Presley and Michael Jackson. One can only hope that Mr. Kudaibergen can avoid the same fate as Elvis and Michael who passed away young, but, instead, continues performing into his eighties like another legend American vocalist Tony Bennett.

For those who haven’t heard of Dimash or seen his performances, please enjoy one of his more popular and complex songs containing a higher level of maturity in the lyrics titled “S.O.S.”. The thought came across that “S.O.S.” has the kind of deeper philosophical message which approximates the musical genre termed peace anthem. The lyrics don’t explicitly advocate for peace in the world, but do reflect the generalized feelings of frustration felt by those activists searching for peace, truth, justice, brotherhood and associated concepts, or, in other words, those higher consciousness ideas embraced and emphasized by people wishing for a better world.

It is unknown whether Dimash Kudaibergen has ever read the great Russian writer Leo Tolstoy, specifically Tolstoy’s profound non-fiction book titled “What is Art?” published in 1898. There is some sense, especially when observing the level of focus, intensity and seriousness with which his performances are characteristic that he has read the classic. The legend and historic icon of non-violent peaceful resistance and satyagraha (“truth force”) Mohandes Gandhi (1869-1948) of India considered “What is Art” Tolstoy’s masterpiece, assessing the book’s messages in higher esteem than Tolstoy’s world-famous novels “War and Peace” and “Anna Karenina”.

If by chance men or women from Kazakhstan pass this way, please consider getting a copy of “What is Art” to your country’s native son and soon-to-be world-famous Dimash. People can obtain a free eBook download of “What is Art” online here. It may seem preposterous to say it after watching him perform with jaw dropped, but after reading Tolstoy’s “What is Art?”, – where the great Russian separates and/or distinguishes true art from what he observed as rubbish in his time – as an artist Dimash Kudaibergen is going to become real good.

Peace.

(Thank you to Dimash Kudaibergen on YouTube)

Trump, May, Moreno Still Silent On Julian Assange.

by Jerry Alatalo

U.S., U.K., Ecuador leaders ignore U.N. international law judgment regarding Julian Assange

German Parliament members and Julian Assange’s father spoke to reporters after meeting with the long-time illegally detained and silenced publisher in London.

n many discussions over the past (8) months since  Ecuador’s government shut off Julian Assange’s ability to communicate from inside Ecuador’s embassy in London to the outside world via phone, internet, mail or during visitations with family and friends, people have wondered aloud how Julian Assange and WikiLeaks would have reported on important news events.

Had Mr. Assange never been framed for crimes he did not commit, or faced extradition to the United States as part of the plan which included the bogus charges, his need for seeking (and receiving) asylum of (now) over (6) years ago from then-President Rafael Correa of Ecuador would never have arisen, and he and WikiLeaks would have continued reporting on world affairs.

Muhammad Ali explains why he decided to refuse induction into the U.S. Army and oppose the Vietnam War.

One becomes reminded of the great heavyweight champion boxer Muhammad Ali, whose refusal to join the U.S. military during the Vietnam War led to his losing the ability to box professionally for years, personally devastating because he was in his physical prime, at the height of his athletic prowess. Ali’s morality-based stance – highlighted by the famous statement “I don’t have anything against those Vietnamese people” – became vindicated later on after it became clear the Vietnam War was initiated based on the false flag lies surrounding the now-infamous “Gulf of Tonkin” incident, which in fact never occurred. Millions of Vietnamese and near 60,000 U.S. servicemen died unnecessarily in what many describe as America’s worst foreign policy catastrophe ever.

Similar to the experiences of Muhammad Ali, Julian Assange has been unjustly persecuted for his antiwar actions. Ali came from the arena of professional sports, Assange from the arena of publishing, and both paid a very high price. Both men knew that their actions risked certain, serious backlash, personal risk and negative consequences from those pushing war agendas, but with conscious intent both Ali and Assange stood firm against the individuals, groups and/or governments who opposed them.

Muhammad Ali eventually regained his freedom and boxing career, going on to take part in some of the most memorable heavyweight fights in history. He boxed well into his 40’s, long after professional boxers retire from the ring, and suffered debilitating physical damages from the accumulated head punches received in matches conducted after  he passed his physical prime.

Boxing legend Muhammad Ali lit the symbolic torch to begin the 1996 Olympic Summer Games in Atlanta, Georgia.

Ali, – like Assange with his antiwar publishing actions – received both strong public criticism and support for his opposition to the Vietnam War, and eventually, as the years passed after the end of the war in Vietnam, became widely regarded as a hero in the public’s perceptions. Despite having lost much of his former ability to speak due to the head injuries from boxing, Ali’s popularity continued, highlighted by his symbolic lighting of the torch in the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. Muhammad Ali passed away in 2016 at the age of 74.

The fate of Julian Assange remains uncertain and perilous, however the millions around the world who support him and demand his freedom received encouraging news in the past few days. Supporters, many contributing their efforts as volunteers through the growing #Unity4J Movement, are hoping for a snowball effect to grow the level of public outcry globally calling for Assange’s release.

On December 20, two members of the German Bundestag’s Foreign Affairs Committee – Heike Haensel and Sevim Dagdelen of the Die Linke or Left Party – met with illegally imprisoned WikiLeaks publisher/leader Julian Assange at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London.

At the end of their meeting they held a press conference outside the embassy and released a declaration signed by more than (30) members of European Parliament and the German Bundestag calling on the UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, Ecuadorian President Lenin Moreno and U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May to take steps toward Assange’s “immediate release”, and that he be granted “safe passage to a safe country” as soon as possible.

The United Nations Working Group on Arbitrary Detention (WGAD) accused Theresa May’s administration of violating international law over an issue of press freedom on December 21st. It is unknown whether Theresa May or anyone in her administration have officially responded to WGAD’s allegations.

To Mr. Trump of the United States, Ms. May of the United Kingdom, and Mr. Moreno of Ecuador:

The ball is now in your court(room). Do the right thing.

Free Julian Assange.

(Thank you to Sputnik at YouTube)

 

Twitter Locks @WikiLeaks And Multiple WikiLeaks Staff Accounts — Caitlin Johnstone

WikiLeaks staff are unable to access or post from the organization’s primary Twitter account or other accounts used by its staff and legal team, according to WikiLeaks editor-in-chief Kristinn Hrafnsson.“These accounts are locked @wikileaks @assangedefence @wltaskforce @assangelegal and cannot be accessed,” Hrafnsson recently tweeted. “They also seem to have been shadow banned. Should we be worried…

via Twitter Locks @WikiLeaks And Multiple WikiLeaks Staff Accounts — Caitlin Johnstone