Documentary: ‘Water Time’ By Allan Weisbecker.

By Jerry Alatalo

aaa-37Alphabet As a person who keeps up on Jim Fetzer’s program “The Real Deal”, his latest posted at MBC Official Backup Channel on YouTube with Allan Weisbecker rose to the qualitative level of sharing it here. After some preliminary discussion between Mr. Weisbecker and Mr. Fetzer, the 90-minute documentary film “Water Time” becomes presented, followed by further discussion between the two men.

A number of wide-ranging, intense thoughts may occur while watching the film, including asking the question “Why hasn’t this powerful film gained much wider viewership?” (Mr. Weisbecker posted on his YT channel, AE Weisbecker, around a year ago – some 7-8,000 views thus far), along with appreciation of the film as a model for how documentary film-making should become produced in the future.

For men and women who’ve spent time going down the “rabbit hole” and researching historic events covered in the film – such as the assassinations of John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Robert F. Kennedy, the Vietnam War, September 11, 2001 etc., Mr. Weisbecker’s over-arching message should not come as any big surprise.

However, for those who’ve either ignored subsequent alternative or new findings of researchers on these events or accepted the so-called “official story”, watching “Water Time” will produce possible severely uncomfortable sensations related to their transformation of perceptions about power and how the world really operates, as illustrated by some of the people Allan Weisbecker talked with during the filming of the documentary.

Mr. Weisbecker made the film as an educational effort, without profit as the motive. His intention is perhaps best summed up in the opening minutes of the film where he says, “I’ve got to find out if there’s something really wrong… I mean with me – or with the rest of the world”.

People hold varying views about what qualifies as a “mediocre”, “good”, “above average”, “excellent”, “masterpiece” etc. documentary film. This writer sees “Water Time: Part I” as an – unfortunately – extraordinarily rare, profoundly revealing artistic triumph which makes a colossal contribution to the shared vision of John F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King expressed in the film – peace on Earth.

Thank you Allan Weisbecker. In the year 2016, the world urgently needs more true artists like him.

(Thank you to MBC Official Backup Channel at YouTube)

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