Trump, May, Moreno Still Silent On Julian Assange.

by Jerry Alatalo

U.S., U.K., Ecuador leaders ignore U.N. international law judgment regarding Julian Assange

German Parliament members and Julian Assange’s father spoke to reporters after meeting with the long-time illegally detained and silenced publisher in London.

n many discussions over the past (8) months since  Ecuador’s government shut off Julian Assange’s ability to communicate from inside Ecuador’s embassy in London to the outside world via phone, internet, mail or during visitations with family and friends, people have wondered aloud how Julian Assange and WikiLeaks would have reported on important news events.

Had Mr. Assange never been framed for crimes he did not commit, or faced extradition to the United States as part of the plan which included the bogus charges, his need for seeking (and receiving) asylum of (now) over (6) years ago from then-President Rafael Correa of Ecuador would never have arisen, and he and WikiLeaks would have continued reporting on world affairs.

Muhammad Ali explains why he decided to refuse induction into the U.S. Army and oppose the Vietnam War.

One becomes reminded of the great heavyweight champion boxer Muhammad Ali, whose refusal to join the U.S. military during the Vietnam War led to his losing the ability to box professionally for years, personally devastating because he was in his physical prime, at the height of his athletic prowess. Ali’s morality-based stance – highlighted by the famous statement “I don’t have anything against those Vietnamese people” – became vindicated later on after it became clear the Vietnam War was initiated based on the false flag lies surrounding the now-infamous “Gulf of Tonkin” incident, which in fact never occurred. Millions of Vietnamese and near 60,000 U.S. servicemen died unnecessarily in what many describe as America’s worst foreign policy catastrophe ever.

Similar to the experiences of Muhammad Ali, Julian Assange has been unjustly persecuted for his antiwar actions. Ali came from the arena of professional sports, Assange from the arena of publishing, and both paid a very high price. Both men knew that their actions risked certain, serious backlash, personal risk and negative consequences from those pushing war agendas, but with conscious intent both Ali and Assange stood firm against the individuals, groups and/or governments who opposed them.

Muhammad Ali eventually regained his freedom and boxing career, going on to take part in some of the most memorable heavyweight fights in history. He boxed well into his 40’s, long after professional boxers retire from the ring, and suffered debilitating physical damages from the accumulated head punches received in matches conducted after  he passed his physical prime.

Boxing legend Muhammad Ali lit the symbolic torch to begin the 1996 Olympic Summer Games in Atlanta, Georgia.

Ali, – like Assange with his antiwar publishing actions – received both strong public criticism and support for his opposition to the Vietnam War, and eventually, as the years passed after the end of the war in Vietnam, became widely regarded as a hero in the public’s perceptions. Despite having lost much of his former ability to speak due to the head injuries from boxing, Ali’s popularity continued, highlighted by his symbolic lighting of the torch in the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. Muhammad Ali passed away in 2016 at the age of 74.

The fate of Julian Assange remains uncertain and perilous, however the millions around the world who support him and demand his freedom received encouraging news in the past few days. Supporters, many contributing their efforts as volunteers through the growing #Unity4J Movement, are hoping for a snowball effect to grow the level of public outcry globally calling for Assange’s release.

On December 20, two members of the German Bundestag’s Foreign Affairs Committee – Heike Haensel and Sevim Dagdelen of the Die Linke or Left Party – met with illegally imprisoned WikiLeaks publisher/leader Julian Assange at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London.

At the end of their meeting they held a press conference outside the embassy and released a declaration signed by more than (30) members of European Parliament and the German Bundestag calling on the UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, Ecuadorian President Lenin Moreno and U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May to take steps toward Assange’s “immediate release”, and that he be granted “safe passage to a safe country” as soon as possible.

The United Nations Working Group on Arbitrary Detention (WGAD) accused Theresa May’s administration of violating international law over an issue of press freedom on December 21st. It is unknown whether Theresa May or anyone in her administration have officially responded to WGAD’s allegations.

To Mr. Trump of the United States, Ms. May of the United Kingdom, and Mr. Moreno of Ecuador:

The ball is now in your court(room). Do the right thing.

Free Julian Assange.

(Thank you to Sputnik at YouTube)

 

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Twitter Locks @WikiLeaks And Multiple WikiLeaks Staff Accounts — Caitlin Johnstone

WikiLeaks staff are unable to access or post from the organization’s primary Twitter account or other accounts used by its staff and legal team, according to WikiLeaks editor-in-chief Kristinn Hrafnsson.“These accounts are locked @wikileaks @assangedefence @wltaskforce @assangelegal and cannot be accessed,” Hrafnsson recently tweeted. “They also seem to have been shadow banned. Should we be worried…

via Twitter Locks @WikiLeaks And Multiple WikiLeaks Staff Accounts — Caitlin Johnstone

Humanity Urged To Rise, Defend Assange Now.

By Jerry Alatalo

“Assassination is the extreme form of censorship.”

– GEORGE BERNARD SHAW (1856-1950) Irish dramatist

hristine Assange, WikiLeaks publisher Julian Assange’s mother, has issued a challenge to peace activists, politicians and journalists around the Earth to act in defense of her son, who she considers has now entered a life-threatening situation.

Anyone who has looked into the situation concerning Julian Assange understands that the man’s unjust, irrational legal persecution of 8-years duration is based on his efforts as publisher of WikiLeaks to end criminal wars of aggression on Earth forever.

For that series of high morality, journalistic actions on his part, Julian Assange has consciously moved forward with full cognizance that severe retribution was always forthcoming and possible, even to the extent which potentially could place him in the same extremely precarious, life-and-death position that men and women of moral conscience through history willingly accepted.

Because Assange willingly accepted the severe consequences of his actions, and because he now faces manifestation of those truly profound personal risks, it becomes necessary for people around the world of varying, similar feelings about improving conditions for humanity vis-à-vis the greatest human issue of war and peace to come to his defense.

Persons aware of Assange’s deteriorating situation might consider life on Earth without people like Julian Assange, – if treated rightly, freed and willing to act for the improving of humanity now and for future generations – when deciding what to do now. Some would describe Assange as a rare genuine hero who has neither committed nor been convicted of any crimes whatsoever, and whose continued imprisonment serves as a historical case study of injustice against an individual which turns the legal foundation of 2018 civilization upside down and totally incoherent.

In other words, what is happening to truth-revealing publisher Julian Assange is simply and obviously wrong from each and every conceivable legal level. For that astonishingly distressing reason, persons in possession of good conscience aware how utterly irrational is his situation have no alternative but to rise up and act powerfully in his defense.

This includes persons of good moral conscience the world over, – because Assange’s worldview and consequent actions have consideration of bettering the health and well-being of all humanity in focus. There is nothing difficult in determining the way Julian Assange is being mistreated – and persecuted for his peace activism over the past 8-years – is simply and clearly wrong. In the same sense, men and women around the world sharing Assange’s morality-based worldview should have no difficulty determining what action(s) are now necessary … natural.

Good people will respond to Julian Assange’s life-threatening situation in a good way. Blessed are the peacemakers.

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(Thank you to Unity4J at YouTube)

Julian Assange Remains Imprisoned.

By Jerry Alatalo

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“I want no money raised by injustice.” 

“Letter of State”, 1027; after pilgrimage to Rome.

– CANUTE “THE GREAT” (995-1035) King of England and Denmark

ikiLeaks publisher Julian Assange remains by almost any definition or perspective a political prisoner inside the Ecuadorian embassy in London, U.K.. Despite having never been charged with a single crime and many expert attorneys and the United Nations stating his detention is simply … well, – wrong,  Mr. Assange is still being held after more than 6-years and denied his clearly justified freedom.

Two historical examples similar to Julian Assange’s are those of Israeli nuclear weapons whistleblower Mordechai Vanunu and Nelson Mandela of South Africa. Remarkably, in both cases unjust, extreme political retribution became chosen and actualized by apartheid states against men opposed to their governments’ policies.

Mr. Vanunu told the world of Israel’s previously secret possession of nuclear weapons and paid the price of enduring long-term silencing and loss of freedom. After the Israeli nuclear technician leaked information on Israel’s secret nuclear weapons to British press in 1986, he was eventually caught in Italy and returned to Israel, where after a behind-closed-doors trial he became sentenced to 18 years in prison, of which 11 of those years were especially brutal in solitary confinement. Pentagon Papers whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg once described Mordechai Vanunu as the “prominent figure of the nuclear era”.

Nelson Mandela, who became a practicing attorney, spent the years 1963-1990 locked up in South African prisons until built-up worldwide pressure started bringing down apartheid. He was finally granted freedom, and after being released from prison he was met by massive crowds of celebrating supporters. Mandela then eventually joined with South African President F. W. de Klerk in bringing an end to apartheid. Mandela shared the Nobel Peace Prize with President F.W. DeKlerk – the man he succeeded as president after Mandela won election in 1994. Nelson Mandela is remembered as one of the most influential political figures of recent history.

In the last years of his life, Nelson Mandela would joke about being labeled a “terrorist” – by those trying to sustain South African apartheid – to fellow members of The Elders group, including Ireland’s former president Mary Robinson, America’s former president Jimmy Carter, former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan (who passed away at 80 on August 18), and other retired leaders in the group. Mr. Mandela wondered out loud to his Elder friends about whether he’d be allowed to pass through the Pearly Gates – considering he was a “terrorist”.

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any hold the erroneous perception that Julian Assange is a whistleblower, but in fact he is a publisher who facilitates dissemination of information obtained by those who find “sitting on” facts which must absolutely become known by all people both unconscionable and willingly accepting of one’s own moral bankruptcy. If one could imagine life were truth, WikiLeaks represents the emergency room and intensive care unit anguished whistleblowers go to after coming to the painful realization they have no other options. Julian Assange’s millions of supporters around the Earth unanimously agree: “Julian’s only ‘crime’ is that of sharing the truth – and that is not a crime.” It is important to note that WikiLeaks’ entire archived, searchable mountain of published materials is 100% accurate – a phenomenal achievement in journalism, taking into account that means WikiLeaks’ over 10,000,000 (ten million!) documents.

Of the nations most responsible and closely associated with the unjust, over 6-years-long imprisoning of Julian Assange – United States, United Kingdom, Ecuador, Australia, – none have the nationwide societal conditions which warrant comparisons to formerly apartheid South Africa and present-day apartheid Israel. South Africa was practicing apartheid through extreme, violent racial discrimination and separation between majority blacks and minority whites, and Israel practices apartheid now through violent racial discrimination and suppression of human rights directed against Palestinians.

The uniquely related form of apartheid visible in the case of Julian Assange is extreme discrimination directed against him specifically and, by extension, all free speech advocates on Earth seriously intent on gaining and sharing vital truth.

The extraordinary situations, circumstances and facts differ between the three men when considering their respective experiences, yet those knowledgeable of Nelson Mandela, Mordechai Vanunu and Julian Assange’s life stories understand they belong with other equally courageous, respected men and women in a distinct grouping. Is it reasonable to suggest “Mandela, Vanunu, Assange …” – positioning the three men in the same sentence – represents a definite distinct continuum?

Here’s the simple, direct, 100% accurate answer …

Free Julian Assange.

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(Thank you to #Unity4J at YouTube)