One Flew Over The Belmarsh Prison.

by Jerry Alatalo

“The deeds on men never deceive the gods.” 

– OVID (43 B.C. – 18 A.D.) Roman poet  

eople concerned about the severe health and well-being threats to the world’s most important publisher-journalist of the 21st century, Julian Assange, are especially concerned during the ongoing extradition hearings at London’s maximum security Belmarsh Prison.

The sense of frustration felt by millions of men and women around the Earth regarding the seemingly endless persecution and increasingly harsh, unjust retribution Assange has been forced to endure for (10) years was captured by authors in the past.

After years of seeming incomprehensible, overly-complex legal wrangling between Mr. Assange’s attorneys and the combined United States-United Kingdom establishment seeking to imprison Assange for life inside America, serious observers surely have felt the “Catch 22” predominant aspect of the affair.

From the motion picture “Catch 22”

Joseph Heller’s book “Catch 22” was eventually made into a major big-screen motion picture, capturing the author’s sense of utter futility and hopelessness in the conditions and circumstances involved in the conducting of wars. “Catch 22” has since become a well-known term for describing the category of human-to-human communications which share the depressing feature of resulting in zero communications at all.

Another book and film in the vicinity of the same genre is “Cool Hand Luke” by author Donn Pearce, perhaps best remembered by the scene where actor Strother Martin, playing the prison warden, explains to the prisoners regarding Luke’s (actor Paul Newman) repeated attempts to escape, that “What we have here, is a failure to communicate!”.

From the motion picture “Cool Hand Luke”

That scene’s dialogue followed the warden’s vicious whipping of Luke as punishment for Luke’s “Stop treating me so nice, boss”, and warden/actor Martin’s Academy Award-worthy delivery of “Don’t ever talk to me like that again! Never! … Never!! … Never!!!”

The book and 1975 Academy Award for Best Picture “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” by author Ken Kesey captures the insanity and brutal nature of Julian Assange’s years long “punishment” for being an effective peace activist, arguably the #1 peace activist of the 21st century. In particular, the character played by Nicholson’s eventual brain lobotomy provides the powerful analogy to the current chemical, pharmaceutical applied intentional destruction of Assange’s brilliant mind.

The character played by actor Jack Nicholson eventually becomes lobotomized into the shape of a non-cognizant, unfeeling human vegetable, leading to his Native American friend, the gentle giant named “Chief”, – performing the ultimate act of mercy – to smother Nicholson’s character to death, before breaking out of the mental institution to freedom.

We hope and suggest it may not yet be too late to heal Julian Assange’s physical, mental and spiritual injuries. There might still be time to save Julian Assange’s life. The chance still exists he might become rightly freed to live out his days and share with all people on Earth the full range of human experiences.

May right actions be taken before it is too late. Walk in beauty.

#FreeAssange

(Thank you to Queentin Tarantula at YouTube)

Trump, May, Moreno Still Silent On Julian Assange.

by Jerry Alatalo

U.S., U.K., Ecuador leaders ignore U.N. international law judgment regarding Julian Assange

German Parliament members and Julian Assange’s father spoke to reporters after meeting with the long-time illegally detained and silenced publisher in London.

n many discussions over the past (8) months since  Ecuador’s government shut off Julian Assange’s ability to communicate from inside Ecuador’s embassy in London to the outside world via phone, internet, mail or during visitations with family and friends, people have wondered aloud how Julian Assange and WikiLeaks would have reported on important news events.

Had Mr. Assange never been framed for crimes he did not commit, or faced extradition to the United States as part of the plan which included the bogus charges, his need for seeking (and receiving) asylum of (now) over (6) years ago from then-President Rafael Correa of Ecuador would never have arisen, and he and WikiLeaks would have continued reporting on world affairs.

Muhammad Ali explains why he decided to refuse induction into the U.S. Army and oppose the Vietnam War.

One becomes reminded of the great heavyweight champion boxer Muhammad Ali, whose refusal to join the U.S. military during the Vietnam War led to his losing the ability to box professionally for years, personally devastating because he was in his physical prime, at the height of his athletic prowess. Ali’s morality-based stance – highlighted by the famous statement “I don’t have anything against those Vietnamese people” – became vindicated later on after it became clear the Vietnam War was initiated based on the false flag lies surrounding the now-infamous “Gulf of Tonkin” incident, which in fact never occurred. Millions of Vietnamese and near 60,000 U.S. servicemen died unnecessarily in what many describe as America’s worst foreign policy catastrophe ever.

Similar to the experiences of Muhammad Ali, Julian Assange has been unjustly persecuted for his antiwar actions. Ali came from the arena of professional sports, Assange from the arena of publishing, and both paid a very high price. Both men knew that their actions risked certain, serious backlash, personal risk and negative consequences from those pushing war agendas, but with conscious intent both Ali and Assange stood firm against the individuals, groups and/or governments who opposed them.

Muhammad Ali eventually regained his freedom and boxing career, going on to take part in some of the most memorable heavyweight fights in history. He boxed well into his 40’s, long after professional boxers retire from the ring, and suffered debilitating physical damages from the accumulated head punches received in matches conducted after  he passed his physical prime.

Boxing legend Muhammad Ali lit the symbolic torch to begin the 1996 Olympic Summer Games in Atlanta, Georgia.

Ali, – like Assange with his antiwar publishing actions – received both strong public criticism and support for his opposition to the Vietnam War, and eventually, as the years passed after the end of the war in Vietnam, became widely regarded as a hero in the public’s perceptions. Despite having lost much of his former ability to speak due to the head injuries from boxing, Ali’s popularity continued, highlighted by his symbolic lighting of the torch in the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. Muhammad Ali passed away in 2016 at the age of 74.

The fate of Julian Assange remains uncertain and perilous, however the millions around the world who support him and demand his freedom received encouraging news in the past few days. Supporters, many contributing their efforts as volunteers through the growing #Unity4J Movement, are hoping for a snowball effect to grow the level of public outcry globally calling for Assange’s release.

On December 20, two members of the German Bundestag’s Foreign Affairs Committee – Heike Haensel and Sevim Dagdelen of the Die Linke or Left Party – met with illegally imprisoned WikiLeaks publisher/leader Julian Assange at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London.

At the end of their meeting they held a press conference outside the embassy and released a declaration signed by more than (30) members of European Parliament and the German Bundestag calling on the UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, Ecuadorian President Lenin Moreno and U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May to take steps toward Assange’s “immediate release”, and that he be granted “safe passage to a safe country” as soon as possible.

The United Nations Working Group on Arbitrary Detention (WGAD) accused Theresa May’s administration of violating international law over an issue of press freedom on December 21st. It is unknown whether Theresa May or anyone in her administration have officially responded to WGAD’s allegations.

To Mr. Trump of the United States, Ms. May of the United Kingdom, and Mr. Moreno of Ecuador:

The ball is now in your court(room). Do the right thing.

Free Julian Assange.

(Thank you to Sputnik at YouTube)