Assange-Correa 2012 Interview Explains 2018.


By Jerry Alatalo

***

“If war no longer occupied men’s thoughts and energies, we could within a generation, put an end to all serious poverty throughout the world.”

– BERTRAND RUSSELL (1872-1970) British mathematician, philosopher

t was shortly after interviewing then Ecuador President Rafael Correa in 2012 that Julian Assange took sanctuary in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, where he has remained for over 6 years – the last 4 months without means of communicating via telephone or computer, and unable to see visitors besides his lawyers.

Approximately 4 months ago Assange’s phone and computer/internet access was effectively cut, along with the total restriction on visitations by close family and friends, by Correa’s successor – President Lenin Moreno, – whose actions came as a profound disappointment and source of grave concern for supporters of Assange the world over.

Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, endured framing on trumped-up charges of rape in Sweden, of which the original victim has long since stopped pursuing. Despite repeated pleas by Assange’s legal team, the Swedish prosecutor of Assange’s case waited for over 5 years before going to London and speaking to Assange personally on details of the alleged “crime”. The bizarre legal situation is clearly related to existential questions of continuance or not of in-practice free speech fundamentals in the age of the internet.

Assange’s situation is one of unprecedented political persecution orchestrated by individuals in highest level power positions, particularly led by the United States, Britain and the West, and exhibiting the objectionable, blackish flavors of Catch-22, Kafka, kangaroo court … etc..

It has now been over a year since the United Nations’ main human rights organization confirmed Assange’s innocence in a published report, stating his continued unjust detainment and neglected medical/physical conditions in confinement constituted serious human rights violations committed by British legal authorities. Despite every aspect of the “case” being in favor of freedom for Assange, he remains, without means of communicating and in virtual solitary confinement, trapped inside the Ecuadorian Embassy.

In the past few days former president of Ecuador Rafael Correa, under whose government Assange received diplomatic protection, has experienced a similar, related form of political/legal persecution, under a process becoming increasingly known as war by other means: “lawfare”. Correa’s successor Lenin Moreno has approved an arrest warrant against Correa on the trumped-up charge of being involved in a kidnapping incident which occurred around 2012.

Rafael Correa now resides in Belgium. The Ecuador judge presiding over the “case” ordered him to travel to Ecuador every two weeks or risk deeper legal problems, effectively placing impossible conditions on the former president for the purpose of forcing him to stay out of the country – with the result being the total block of Rafael Correa’s participation in Ecuadorian politics.

Going back to 2012 and listening to an interview of Rafael Correa by Julian Assange, shortly after which Assange entered the Ecuadorian Embassy, contributes to a greater understanding of the relevant facts behind the subsequent malevolent, unjust treatment of these two highly influential and respected, globally recognized leaders – one in the field of deep investigative journalism, and the other in the arena of Latin American political and socioeconomic evolution.

(Thank you to RT at YouTube)

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2 thoughts on “Assange-Correa 2012 Interview Explains 2018.

  1. An interesting, informative, and revelatory interview. What Correa said about the power of the media in Latin America rings true for Brazil.

    “Welcome to the Club of the Persecuted,” Correa tells Assange in closing. That Club has since grown.

    Like

    1. Rosaliene,

      How are you. Putin had a similar, empathetic message for Oliver Stone during filming of the interview, something like “Are you prepared to get beat up?…” or such. After the bogus kidnapping “warrant” and simultaneous ending of Ecuador government paid personal security for his protection (similar to ex-U.S. presidents having lifetime secret service protection), Rafael Correa came right out and said publicly Moreno and associates in Ecuador were “trying to get me killed”. Scary stuff …

      Thank you, Rosaliene.

      Peace.

      Like

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